We are now offering after hours appointments. Call us for availability.

  • Contact Us

    1105 Main Street
    Dunedin, FL 34698

    (727) 265 1DOG(1364)

    Read More
  • Timely Appointments

    We carefully schedule so you don't have to wait all day.

    Read More
  • All Sizes Welcome

    At The Paw Shop no dog is too big or too small.

    Read More
  • Satisfied Customers

    Check out our satisfied customers!

    Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
Super User

Super User

Sunday, 20 January 2013 20:26

English Setter

The English Setter is a breed of dog. It is part of the Setter family, which includes red Irish Setters, Irish Red and White Setters, and black-and-tan Gordon Setters. It is a gun dog, bred for a mix of endurance and athleticism.

Dog Grooming for the English Setter:

The English Setter needs to be brushed at least three times per week to maintain coat and skin health as well as to remove tangles and mats. This breed is an average shedder and regular brushing will keep loose hair from landing around the house. Setters should be bathed every six to eight weeks to keep them smelling fresh, and bath day is also a good day for a trim, to keep the hair looking neat. It's easy to do at home, but some owners prefer to use the services of a professional groomer.

The ears of the English Setter do not circulate air very well, and this breed is prone to ear infections. Check the ears once per week for signs of wax buildup, redness, or irritation. Use only a cotton ball and a veterinarian-approved cleanser for the ears. Weekly brushing of the teeth will keep the Setter's breath fresh and promote good gum health. If the dog does not wear his nails down naturally outdoors, monthly nail trimmings will be in order

Sunday, 20 January 2013 20:16

Irish Setter

Irish Setters originated as gundogs in their native Ireland, and their popularity soon spread, thanks to the beauty of their rich mahogany coat and their enthusiasm as bird dogs. They're friendly, mischievous, and inquisitive, with a high energy level. This is a bold and boisterous family friend with the potential to do well in many canine sports and activities.

Dog Grooming for the Irish Setter:

Brush your Irish Setter at least every other day to keep his coat shiny and tangle-free. Check for burrs and other debris any time he's been out in the field or on a hike. Unless he rolls in something stinky, he shouldn't need more than a couple of times a year, as long as you keep him well brushed. You can bath him more frequently if you want, however, and you'll need to if you plan to show him. Use a shampoo made for dogs to avoid drying out his coat and skin.

All breeds with pendant, or hanging, ears tend to have issues with ear infections. Check your Irish Setter's ears weekly and wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Never stick cotton swabs or anything else into the ear canal or you might damage it. Your Irish Setter may have an ear infection if the inside of the ear smells bad, looks red or seems tender, or he frequently shakes his head or scratches at his ear.

Brush your Irish Setter's at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.

Trim nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they're too long. Short, neatly trimmed nails keep the feet in good condition and prevent your legs from getting scratched when your Irish Setter enthusiastically jumps up to greet you.

 

 

Sunday, 20 January 2013 20:10

Schnauzer

A schnauzer (pron.: /ˈʃnaʊzər/) (German: [ˈʃnaʊtsɐ], plural schnauzen) is a dog breed that originated in Germany in the 15th and 16th centuries. The term comes from the German word for "mustache", because of the dog's distinctively bearded snout. Some authorities, such as Encyclopædia Britannica, also claim that the name is derived from the word's secondary meaning of "moustache". Although the schnauzer is considered a terrier-type dog, they do not have the typical terrier temperament.

Dog Grooming for the Schnauzer"

Standard Schnauzers require a lot of grooming to look their best. You'll need to brush the beard and legs daily to prevent tangles, and wash his face after every meal.

A Standard Schnauzer's coat usually must be hand-stripped every four to six months if you show your dog or like the look and feel of the proper coat, but pets can be clipped by your groomer. Be warned, however, that if his coat is clipped, instead of stripped, the texture will soften, and he'll shed more.

Other grooming needs include dental hygiene and nail care. Brush your Standard Schnauzer's teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the accompanying bacteria. Daily is better.

Trim his nails once or twice a month, as needed. If you can hear the nail clicking on the floor, they're too long. Short nails keep the feet in good condition and won't scratch your legs when your Standard Schnauzer jumps up to greet you.

Sunday, 20 January 2013 15:23

Toy Poddle

The poodle is a breed of dog. The breed is found officially in toy, miniature, and standard sizes, with many coat colors. Originally bred as a type of water dog, the poodle is skillful in many dog sports, including agility, obedience, tracking, and even herding. Poodles have taken top honors in many conformation shows, including "Best in Show" at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1991 and 2002, and at the World Dog Show in 2007 and 2010.

Dog Grooming for the Poodle:

Grooming a Poodle isn't for the faint of heart. Poodles are high-maintenance dogs. He requires regular grooming, every three to six weeks, sometimes more often, to keep the coat in good condition. If you are considering a Poodle, consider the upkeep of the coat and expense of grooming.

Don't be scared, though. There are many ways to style the coat for easier care. In fact, many owners simply shave it off.

That said, easy care doesn't mean without care. Even when clipped short, your Poodle will need to be brushed, bathed, and trimmed every three to six weeks, sometimes more often, to keep the coat clean, short, and tangle free.

Most owners pay a professional groomer, but if you're dedicated and have the time, you can learn to groom your Poodle yourself. You'll need a good set of electric clippers and blades, a quality pair of scissors, brush, comb, toenail trimmer, and a good how-to grooming book or video--there are many on the market just for Poodle owners.

Even if you let a professional handle the complicated stuff, your Poodle needs daily brushing. Because Poodles don't shed like other breeds, loose hair collects in the coats, and unless it's brushed out daily, the hair will mat very quickly.

Many Poodles have weepy eyes that stain the hair under their eyes. The lighter your dog's coat, the more noticeable the tearstains. To cut down on staining, wipe around the eyes and face every day with an alcohol-free pet wipe or washcloth dampened with warm water.

Be sure to check your Poodle's ears often every week for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that can indicate an infection, then wipe them out weekly with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to prevent problems. Breeds with drop-down ears are prone to ear infections because the ear canal stays dark and moist. Also, hair grows in the Poodle's ear canal. Sometimes, this hair needs to be plucked. Ask your groomer or veterinarian if it's necessary for your dog.

Brush your Poodle's teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.

Trim nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they're too long. Short, neatly trimmed nails keep the feet in good condition and prevent your legs from getting scratched when your Poodle enthusiastically jumps up to greet you.

Sunday, 20 January 2013 15:17

Maltese

The Maltese is a small breed of dog in the Toy Group. It descends from dogs originating in the Central Mediterranean Area. The breed name and origins are generally understood to derive from the Mediterranean island nation of Malta; however, the name is sometimes described with reference to the distinct Adriatic island of Mljet, or a defunct Sicilian town called Melita.

Dog Grooming for the Maltese:

The stunning Maltese coat is pure white, silky, and straight, reaching all the way to the ground. Maltese don't have the undercoat typical to many breeds and don't shed much. On the down side, Maltese coats mat easily and become dirty. In addition, Maltese are prone to unsightly tear stains on their faces.

Gently brush and comb the coat of your Maltese daily, even if he has a sporty short trim. This helps to prevent mats and keep him clean. Beautiful though they may be, Maltese become dirty easily and usually must be bathed weekly.

If your Maltese has long hair and develops mats, first try to work out the mat gently with your fingers, using a detangler spray or a coat conditioning oil. After you've pulled the mat apart as much as you can with your fingers, use the end tooth of the comb to loosen individual hairs. Never try to pull the entire mat out at once with the comb or brush, and make sure all mats are removed prior to bathing your Maltese as mats tend to get tighter when wet.

You should check your Maltese's ears at least once a week. If they seem sensitive or have a bad odor, take him to the vet for a checkup. Also, Maltese grow a lot of hair in their ears that needs to be removed. Ask your groomer or vet to do this or to show you how to pluck the hair at home.

Trim his nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they're too long. Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding--and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out. So, if you're not experienced trimming dog nails, ask your groomer for pointers.

Tear and face staining are big problems for most Maltese owners. You should expect tear staining to begin when your puppy is four to five months old (that's the age that their adult teeth are coming in). 

Many people put the hair on the top of their Maltese's head into a topknot to keep it away from the eyes. If you decide to do this, be sure to use coated bands that won't break the hair. Some people clip their dog's hair short, on its head or all over, so grooming is easier.

Brush your Maltese's teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.

Sunday, 20 January 2013 15:16

Havanese

The Havanese, a breed of Bichon type, is the national dog of Cuba, developed from the now extinct Blanquito de la Habana ("little white dog of Havana"). The Blanquito descended from the also now extinct Bichon Tenerife. It is believed that the Blanquito was eventually cross-bred with other Bichon types, including the Poodle, to create what is now known as the Havanese. Sometimes referred to as "Havana Silk Dogs," this was originally another name for the Blanquito de la Habana.

The Havanese is small in size and sturdy in structure with a tail carried over its back and ears that drop and fold. The coat is abundant, long, and silky and comes in all colors. The Havanese has a spirited personality and a curious disposition, and is notable for its springy gait, a characteristic that distinguishes the breed from all others. The Havanese is considered an ideal family pet and a true companion dog. They are highly adaptable to almost any environment, and their only desire is to be with their human companions. Because of their strong social needs, Havanese will not thrive in an environment where they are isolated for several hours each day.

The coat can be clipped short for easier care. If the coat is to be kept long it needs to be thoroughly brushed and combed at least twice a week. There is a lotion available to prevent the hair from splitting. Corded coats require special care. Clip excess hair from between the pads of the feet. The feet themselves may be clipped to look round. Show dogs need a great deal more grooming. There is little to no shedding, so dead hair must be removed by brushing. Check the eyes and ears regularly. If the ears are not kept clean it is prone to get an ear infection. The beauty of a well groomed Havanese is that he still looks tousled and carefree. If you accustom your dog to nail clipping from puppy age, she should accept the routine as an adult. Teeth should be brushed weekly, and this is also best started as a puppy. This breed is good for allergy sufferers. They are a non-shedding, hypo-allergenic dog.

Sunday, 20 January 2013 15:16

Pekingese

The Pekingese (also known as the Lion-Dog, Pekingese Lion-Dog, Pelchie Dog, or Peke) is an ancient breed of toy dog, originating in China. They are called Lion-Dogs due to their resemblance to Chinese guardian lions. The breed was favored by the Chinese Imperial court, and its name refers to the city of Peking in Beijing where the Forbidden City resides. The breed has several characteristics and health issues related to its unique appearance. Because of its desirable characteristics, the Pekingese has been part of the development of designer crossbreeds, such as the Peke-a-tese (crossed with Maltese). The Pekingese, originating from Western China, were proud companions of the Chinese Buddhist Monks. These dogs are also found to be owned by Chinese princes.

Dog Grooming for the Pekingese:

Unless you're showing your Pekingese, you can brush your Peke's coat weekly with a small bristle brush, curry brush, or shedding comb. Before brushing, mist the coat lightly with water to prevent the hair from breaking. Brush all the way down to the skin; if you just go over the top of the coat, you won't get out the dead hair that forms mats and tangles. Continue to mist the hair as you brush each area of the body. Use a metal comb on the feathering and fringing on the legs, ears, and tail. These areas tangle easily, so comb them daily.

Clean the face and around the eyes daily with a damp cotton ball to prevent problems with the skin folds in the area. Keep skin folds clean and dry to prevent infections. Any time your Peke gets wet, thoroughly dry the skin folds until no dampness remains.

Bath your Pekingese once or twice a month, as needed. Use a shampoo made for dogs so you don't dry out his coat. You can also shake on a dry dog shampoo and then brush it out.

Trim the hair on the feet to prevent mats from developing and foreign objects from becoming tangled there. Trim the nails regularly, usually every two or three weeks. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they're too long. Teaching your Peke puppy to accept having his teeth brushed at least weekly (daily is better) can help prevent dental disease later in life, a common problem in small dogs.

Sunday, 20 January 2013 15:14

Bishon Frise

The Bichon Frise descended from the Barbet or Water Spaniel and the Standard Poodle. The word bichon comes from Middle French bichon ("small long-haired dog"), a diminutive of Old French biche ("bitch, female dog"), from Old English bicce ("bitch, female dog"), related to Old Norse bikkja ("female dog") and German Betze ("female dog"). Some speculate the origin of bichon to be the result of the apheresis, or shortening, of the word barbichon ("small poodle"), a derivative of barbiche ("shaggy dog"); however, this is unlikely, if not impossible, since the word bichon (attested 1588) is older than barbichon (attested 1694).

The Bichons were divided into four categories: the Bichon Maltese, the Bichon Bolognaise, the Bichon Havanese and the Bichon Tenerife. All originated in the Mediterranean area. Because of their merry disposition, they traveled much and were often used as barter by sailors as they moved from continent to continent. The dogs found early success in Spain and it is generally believed that Spanish seamen introduced the breed to the Canary Island of Tenerife. In the 14th century, Italian sailors rediscovered the little dogs on their voyages and are credited with returning them to the continent, where they became great favorites of Italian nobility. Often, as was the style of the day with dogs in the courts, they were cut "lion style," like a modern-day Portuguese Water Dog.

Though not considered a retriever or water dog, the Bichon, due to its ancestry as a sailor's dog, has an affinity for and enjoys water and retrieving. On the boats however, the dog's job was that of a companion dog.

The "Tenerife", or "Bichon", had success in France during the Renaissance under Francis I (1515–1547), but its popularity skyrocketed in the court of Henry III (1574–1589). The breed also enjoyed considerable success in Spain as a favorite of the Infantas, and painters of the Spanish school often included them in their works. For example, the famous artist, Francisco de Goya, included a Bichon in several of his works.

Interest in the breed was renewed during the rule of Napoleon III, but then waned until the late 19th century when it became the "common dog", running the streets, accompanying the organ grinders of Barbary, leading the blind and doing tricks in circuses and fairs.

On 5 March 1933, the official standard of the breed was adopted by the Société Centrale Canine, the national kennel club for France.[6] (This was largely due to the success of the French-speaking Belgian author Hergé's "Tintin" books, which featured a small, fluffy, white dog named Milou.) As the breed was known by two names at that time, "Tenerife" and "Bichon", the president of the Fédération Cynologique Internationale proposed a name based on the characteristics that the dogs presented - the Bichon Frisé. ("Frisé" means "curly", referring to the breed's coat.) On 18 October 1934, the Bichon Frisé was admitted to the stud book of the Société Centrale Canine.

The Bichon was popularized in Australia in the mid 1960s, largely thanks to the Channel Nine mini-series Meweth, starring Bruce Gyngell alongside his pet Bichon, Molly. The show ran for one season only, however it gained a cult following. In subsequent years Bichon ownership, especially in the Eastern states, climbed dramatically.

The Bichon was brought to the United States in 1955, and was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1973. The first US-born Bichon litter was whelped in 1956. In 1959 and 1960, two breeders in different parts of the USA acquired Bichons, which provided the origins for the breed's development in the USA.

The Bichon Frise became eligible to enter the AKC's Miscellaneous Class on 1 September 1971. In October, 1972, the breed was admitted to registration in the American Kennel Club Stud Book. On 4 April 1973, the breed became eligible to show in the Non-Sporting Group at AKC dog shows. In 2001, a Bichon Frise named JR won best-in-show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

Dog Grooming for the Bichon Frise:

This breed should be groomed frequently and bathed every month. Professional grooming is recommended every 4 weeks. Trim around the eyes and ears with a blunt pair of scissors and clean the eyes extensively to prevent staining. Show dogs are trimmed with scissors. The body of pet dogs may be clipped with electric clippers though the rest of the dog must still be cut with scissors. The Bichon sheds little to no hair and is good for allergy sufferers

Page 2 of 2